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Discussion papers and briefings

In addition to our in-depth reports, MGI publishes discussion papers, which offer initial findings inviting further research, and briefings, which provide a synthesis of key facts and insights.

The power of parity: Advancing gender equality in the Dutch labor market

– Bridging the gender gap in the Dutch labor market brings significant opportunities both for individuals and the wider economy.

Notes from the frontier: Modeling the impact of AI on the world economy

– Artificial intelligence has large potential to contribute to global economic activity. But widening gaps among countries, companies, and workers will need to be managed to maximize the benefits.

Solving the United Kingdom’s productivity puzzle in a digital age

– New research explains why the United Kingdom has been experiencing historically low productivity growth and what can be done to return to long-run averages.

A decade after the global financial crisis: What has (and hasn’t) changed?

– The world economy has recently returned to robust growth. But some familiar risks are creeping back, and new ones have emerged.

Smart cities in Southeast Asia

– Smart solutions can help cities across the region manage the next stage of growth.

Rising corporate debt: Peril or promise?

– Corporate bond issuance has increased 2.5 times over the past ten years, creating a broader and deeper market in many countries. But there are rising risks.

AI, automation, and the future of work: Ten things to solve for

– As machines increasingly complement human labor in the workplace, we will all need to adjust to reap the benefits.

Notes from the AI frontier: Applications and value of deep learning

– An analysis of more than 400 use cases across 19 industries and nine business functions highlights the broad use and significant economic potential of advanced AI techniques.

Europe’s economy: Three pathways to rebuilding trust and sustaining momentum

– Europe has an opportunity to ensure that growth and well-being continue in the long term, and to strengthen trust in its institutions.

Preparing Brazil for the future of work: Jobs, technology, and skills

– Automation is coming, disrupting the world of work at unprecedented speed and scale. Here’s how the largest economy in Latin America can face the challenge.

Bridging infrastructure gaps: Has the world made progress?

– Despite increased spending and pockets of progress, infrastructure investment gaps remain.

Housing affordability: A supply-side tool kit for cities

– Global housing stock has not expanded quickly enough to keep up with a surge in demand, but cities can focus on three supply-side solutions to make progress.

10 imperatives for Europe in the age of AI and automation

– Europe, while making progress, is behind the US and China in capturing the opportunities of artificial intelligence and automation.

China’s digital economy: A leading global force

– China is already more digitized than many observers appreciate and has the potential to set the world’s digital frontier in coming decades.

How artificial intelligence can deliver real value to companies

– Companies new to the space can learn a great deal from early adopters who have invested billions into AI and are now beginning to reap a range of benefits.

A new emphasis on gainful employment in India

– As India’s labor market shifts, it is time to focus on improved quality of work and the income derived from it, not simply the number of jobs being lost or created.

What’s now and next in analytics, AI, and automation

– Innovations in digitization, analytics, artificial intelligence, and automation are creating performance and productivity opportunities for business and the economy, even as they reshape employment and the future of work.

China’s role in the next phase of globalization

– The country could exert leadership in seeking to preserve globalization’s benefits while addressing its downsides.

How to counter three threats to growth in Latin America

– The region needs to remove obstacles to competitiveness, pursue digitization, raise skills, and improve economic fundamentals.

New insights into the slowdown in US productivity growth

– Can the productivity puzzle be solved? Fresh analysis examines the issue and highlights opportunities for companies and policy makers to act on.

New priorities for the European Union at 60

– As the EU faces an inflection point, its response to three global forces will shape the path forward.

Where companies with a long-term view outperform their peers

– Our new Corporate Horizon Index provides systematic evidence that a long-term approach can lead to superior performance for revenue and earnings, investment, market capitalization, and job creation.

Technology, jobs, and the future of work

– Automation, digital platforms, and other innovations are changing the fundamental nature of work. Understanding these shifts can help policy makers, business leaders, and workers move forward.

Can the US economy return to dynamic and inclusive growth?

– Slower economic growth in the United States has wrought a vicious cycle that has hobbled many American households. Targeted investment and policy action could turn it around.

Realizing gender equality’s $12 trillion economic opportunity

– Investing in access to essential services and reducing the gap in labor-force participation rates could significantly expand the global economy by 2025.

Secular stagnation and low investment: Breaking the vicious cycle—a discussion paper

– Discussion paper: Ultra-low interest rates have failed to spark investment and economic demand. What can be done?

QE and ultra-low interest rates: Distributional effects and risks

– Ultra-low interest rates, in part as a result of central-bank policies since 2007, have had a very different distributional impact on governments, corporations, financial institutions, and households.

How the world could better fight obesity

– If the prevalence of obesity continues on its rising trend, almost half of the world’s adult population could be overweight or obese by 2030, imposing even greater personal, social, and economic costs. Effectively combating obesity around the world may require a comprehensive strategy of 44 interventions as part of a potential Obesity Abatement Program.

An exorbitant privilege? Implications of reserve currencies for competitiveness

– Could the US prioritize domestic growth and jobs over its global responsibilities, sparking greater currency volatility that threatens competitiveness?