McKinsey Quarterly 2017 V4
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Artificial intelligence takes shape

Examines AI-driven automation and how it will transform the economy, discusses why lifelong learning should be a corporate priority, and lays out the health imperative for organizations.

HOW TECHNOLOGY IS RESHAPING THE WORKPLACE AND THE ECONOMY

Article - McKinsey Quarterly

Where is technology taking the economy?

– We are creating an intelligence that is external to humans and housed in the virtual economy. This is bringing us into a new economic era—a distributive one—where different rules apply.
Interview - McKinsey Quarterly

Rethinking the workplace: Flexibility, fairness, and enlightened automation

– People aren’t powerless in the face of new technologies; the future of work is up to us.

THE BUSINESS CASE FOR LIFELONG LEARNING

Commentary - McKinsey Quarterly

Putting lifelong learning on the CEO agenda

– In an open letter to business leaders, a Harvard Business School professor and a learning engineer at the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative present an emphatic case to make learning a corporate priority.
Commentary - McKinsey Quarterly

Getting ready for the future of work

– Artificial intelligence is poised to disrupt the workplace. What will the company of the future look like—and how will people keep up?
Commentary - McKinsey Quarterly

Learning innovation in the digital age

– As the workplace changes, so must education and training. Exciting experiments are under way—but are they enough?

THE HEALTH IMPERATIVE FOR ORGANIZATIONS, INDIVIDUALS, AND LEADERS

Article - McKinsey Quarterly

Organizational health: A fast track to performance improvement

– Working on health works. It’s good for your people and for your bottom line.
Article - McKinsey Quarterly

The yin and yang of organizational health

– Sustained performance over the long term and successful transformation in the near term require many of the same ingredients.
Commentary - McKinsey Quarterly

Wellness at work: The promise and pitfalls

– It takes more than a discounted health-club membership to move the needle on employee well-being.
Article - McKinsey Quarterly

Memo to the CEO: Are you the source of workplace dysfunction?

– Rudeness and bullying are rife, says Stanford professor Bob Sutton. Wise leaders figure out how to fix their teams and organizations; and they start by taking a long look in the mirror.

OTHER FEATURES

Interview - McKinsey Quarterly

Safe enough to try: An interview with Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh

– Organizations are more likely to innovate and thrive when they unleash the potential of individuals and the power of self-organizing teams, says the online retailer’s CEO.

Research, trends, and emerging thinking

Commentary - McKinsey Quarterly

Democratizing diversity

– The general manager of people and culture at Australia’s Origin Energy explains why it’s important to go beyond top-down objectives and targets.
Article - McKinsey Quarterly

How the semiconductor industry is taking charge of its transformation

– Three snapshots demonstrate areas of change and opportunity.
Article - McKinsey Quarterly

Putting the right price on customer interactions

– Consumers are willing to pay more for choice in their interactions, yet most companies remain perplexed about which ones their customers really want—and how much to charge for them.
Article - McKinsey Quarterly

Fighting portfolio complexity

– Many consumer-packaged-goods companies are placing too many bets. Greater simplicity and agility increase the odds of higher performance.
Article - McKinsey Quarterly

A new map for strategic growth in banking

– Portfolio strategists need to look beyond economic development when eyeing new investment.
Article - McKinsey Quarterly

Applying stress tests beyond banking

– The technique can provide important insights to many companies operating under uncertainty.
Commentary - McKinsey Quarterly

Creating an innovation culture

– Corning’s Silicon Valley technology chief shares how to stay creative over the long haul, drawing on 40 years of experience.