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Jobs lost, jobs gained: Workforce transitions in a time of automation

Back to Automation and the future of work

Jobs lost, jobs gained: Workforce transitions in a time of automation

MGI’s latest research on the future of work picked up from the earlier work on automation. It developed a range of scenarios for how the mix of occupations could evolve within countries through 2030 as a result of automation and potential new labor demand, and what the implications could be for skills and wages. One key finding was that the net effect of automation could vary widely between advanced and developing economies, depending on factors including wage rates, demographics, GDP per capita growth, and the economic structure of countries, which affects their potential for automation.

The analysis suggested that advanced economies will create sufficient new jobs to offset the impact of automation by 2030. Globally, however, the workforce transitions ahead will be very large. Between 75 million and 375 million people may need to switch occupational group by 2030 due to automation, and will need to learn new skills or increase their level of education in order to find work.

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In the media

Jobs
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The Wall Street Journal: Forget robots: Bad public policies could be bigger job killers

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Financial Times: Investment key to securing human role in robotic world

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The New York Times: AI will transform the economy. But how much, and how soon?

Article

Wired: Robots threaten bigger slice of jobs in US, other rich nations

Video

Automation and the new world of work

Powerful new technologies including automation, robotics, and artificial intelligence are increasing productivity, improving lives and reshaping our world. But what happens to our jobs?

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Chui says robot jobs apocalypse predictions are overblown

Michael Chui, partner at McKinsey Global Institute, discusses what automation means for future job markets with Vonnie Quinn and Mark Barton on "Bloomberg Markets."
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Job killer?

70 million Americans, or about one-third of all U.S. workers, could see their jobs displaced by 2030. CNBC asked Michael Chui what the findings mean for white collar jobs and the workforce of the future.
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The Churchill Club Presents Jobs Lost, Jobs Gained: Session 1

Michael Chui, Partner, McKinsey Global Institute interviews Zoë Baird, CEO, The Markle Foundation and Tim O’Reilly, CEO, O’Reilly Media about the implications of automation on skills and jobs in the future.
Video

The Churchill Club Presents Jobs Lost, Jobs Gained: Session 2

James Manyika, Chairman & Director, McKinsey Global Institute interviews John Donahoe, CEO, ServiceNow and Jeff Weiner, CEO, LinkedIn about how to prepare today for the new world of work.

Audio

Podcast - McKinsey Global Institute

What is the future of work?

– A new podcast series from the McKinsey Global Institute explores how technologies like automation, robotics, and artificial intelligence are shaping how we work, where we work, and the skills we need to work.

Connect with the McKinsey Global Institute