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Ayebea applied for McKinsey’s Emerging Scholars but was not selected. That didn’t stop her from applying for a summer internship. And we’re so glad she persisted. Ayebea will be joining us for an internship this summer. As you read her story, we hope you’ll decide to apply for Emerging Scholars; even if you don’t receive the scholarship, this can be the start of your next adventure. The Emerging Scholars program is accepting applications from now until May 17.

How did you find out about Emerging Scholars?

I heard about the program through the Wharton African Students Association (WASA). I was interested in consulting and wanted to start learning more about the work. I applied to learn more about McKinsey and to start developing strong relationships with people at the firm.

Tell us about your Emerging Scholars application process.

I applied in May 2017, just before starting at Wharton in the fall. Just completing the application was a good experience because it helped me reflect on my experiences and career goals before school began.

Even though I was not selected as an Emerging Scholar, I signed up for McKinsey’s Keep In Touch program, which has given me a holistic view of McKinsey, beyond what I would have learned solely going through recruiting. Through newsletters and webinars, I’ve learned about McKinsey’s research, its commitment to social impact and diversity in the workplace, new roles and paths at the firm (e.g., Healthcare Analytics), and some of the many things alumni go on to accomplish.

Why did you reapply as a summer intern?

Everything I learned made me want to be part of the firm more than ever. I decided to apply again in January for a summer associate role. This time I was better prepared for my interviews and more confident in my decision and skills. I was thrilled when my final round interviewer called me to say I’d received an offer to join this summer.

Why did you accept your offer?

There were two main considerations in my decision. First, I was drawn to McKinsey’s culture of leadership, mentorship and community. I knew I could be at my best at the firm. I want to work in consulting for the foreseeable future, so the emphasis McKinsey places on developing its people was a big factor in my decision. Second, I was impressed by McKinsey’s wide–reaching and meaningful work on the African continent. Long–term, I want to work in small and medium enterprise development in my home country of Ghana. McKinsey has been present in Africa longer than any other consulting firm and the firm’s history there will prepare me to tackle the challenges facing businesses on the continent today.

Inline Ayebea

As you prepare for the summer, what excites you most?

I am most excited about helping clients and getting to know more people at McKinsey. The internship will allow me to truly experience McKinsey over the course of about 10 weeks. I know I’ll have a significant role to play on my engagement team and am looking forward to understanding first–hand what makes McKinsey one of the best places to work.

More about Ayebea

I’m originally from Ghana. During my undergraduate degree at Hamilton College, I was particularly interested in the role of education in economic development. I researched the effect of education levels on urbanization rates in developing nations. After graduation, I worked in economic consulting at The Brattle Group in Boston, providing independent analysis to governments looking to enforce tax law and protect the economic interests of consumers.

I’m currently pursuing an MBA at The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. I’m an active member of Say Yes to Education, the Wharton Africa Students Association, the African American MBA Association, and the Consulting Club.

Outside of school and work, I love traveling to experience other cultures and foods, watching thought–provoking TV, painting, and engaging with young minds through tutoring.

Apply for Emerging Scholars today

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